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student loansAccording to CNNMoney.com Interest rates on student loans subsidized by the government will most likely double to 6.8 percent on July 1, 2013. Even though Congress and the White House agree that something needs to be done, no one can find a common solution. Each side of the isle has their own ideas: meanwhile about 7 million students taking out subsidized loans for the next school year will find their loans significantly larger than expected.

We have several videos on our web site.

Below is one that might be of interest:

♦ “Meet Ms. Drain and Suggestions on How to Hire an Attorney”

MUSINGS BY DIANE: “Why not double the interest rate on student loans.  Let’s keep our future handcuffed to student loans for the rest of their lives.  Those of us who took student loans in the past did so because the interest rate was extremely reasonable.  Why are the current students not given the same respect we were?”

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Diane L. Drain

Diane L. Drain, bankruptcy attorney, retired law professor, mentor and community spokesperson.

About Diane Drain:

Diane is a well respected Arizona bankruptcy and foreclosure attorney. As a retired law professor, she believes in offering everyone, not just her clients, advice about bankruptcy and Arizona foreclosure laws. Diane is also a mentor to hundreds of Arizona attorneys.

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*Important Note from Diane: Everything on this web site is offered for educational purposes only and not intended to provide legal advice, nor create an attorney client relationship between you, me, or the author of any article. Any information in this web site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from an attorney familiar with your personal circumstances and licensed to practice law in your state. Make sure to check out their reviews.*

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